The outcome of the MBA Project is a written report of no more than 16,500 words in length, based upon a comprehensive understanding of the relevant literature and elements of primary as well as secondary data research that you have conducted yourself. You are to include an annex of no more than 2,500 words reflecting on how the Director’s workshops and your research for the MBA Project will affect your future approach to business and management.

The MBA Project is led by a suitable management issue, problem or business opportunity which is critically discussed or evaluated with reference to existing research and primary as well as secondary data. An understanding of the academic debate and critical application of existing research (and the student’s own research) to a case, are key to the MBA Project. To help students select and address a suitable topic, a series of Director’s Workshops are run during the Autumn and Spring Terms, addressing current business issues, academic writing and global developments.


Module Description
This advanced 10 credit module provides students with the frameworks and the skills to lead innovative projects and ventures within an organisational setting and a critical understanding of economic, sociological, psychological and managerial theories of enterprise creation and development and their application in the world of business and in the wider economy. The focus is on the formation of new ventures, product/process/service/business model innovation, and their impact on economic and social development in different environments. 

Aims

This module provides the necessary theoretical framework for the study and the practice of entrepreneurship, defined as new venture creation and innovative growth relating to different types of organisations and environments. The module will provide the critical, theoretical underpinning for the study and investigation of enterprise development and the three critical components of entrepreneurship:

Entrepreneurial People.

Entrepreneurial Organisations.

Entrepreneurial Environments.

It will also provide insights into and models for the practice of entrepreneurship and innovation in different organisational and economic environments, much of which is concerned with the process of entrepreneurship and the development of appropriate business models.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

 1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of different theoretical approaches to business and new venture creation, growth and maturity in different spatial contexts.

2. Explain conceptual issues on entrepreneurship and its links with innovation clearly and concisely and how these concepts help us better understand economic and social development.

3. Evaluate and explain the relationship between different types of new ventures, as in new small firms, corporate entrepreneurship, new ventures within public and not-for-profit organisations in different countries and develop relevant business models for their growth.

4. Develop realistic ideas for engaging with new business creation and growth in different environments.

5. Identify opportunities for and develop an innovative venture or project within an organisational setting’.

6. Be familiar with synchronous and asynchronous forms of online and face to face (in campus ) learning and communication together with techniques for research-based business report and academic essay writing .


Module Description

This 10 credit compulsory module is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of the external context within which international businesses operate and the opportunities and challenges it poses to entrepreneurial firms, large and small. It introduces to students key concepts such as globalisation, international trade theories and practices. The several remaining lectures are dedicated to discussing the external challenges facing international firms, particularly economic, financial, political/legal, technological and cultural challenges.


Module Aims

The main aim of the module is to enable students to obtain a thorough and critical understanding of the complex process of international business activity and the different ways large and small firms manage the process of change associated with international growth.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
* Obtain a critical understanding of the reasons businesses expand to international markets;

* Understand and critique different theories of international trade;

* Obtain a critical understanding of the economic, political/legal, technological and cultural issues and challenges that surround international expansion;

* Obtain a critical understanding of the global flows of resources, ideas, knowledge and people, as key features of the global enterprise;

* Critically evaluate ways in which challenges might be overcome and firms can maintain a competitive position.


BE855 Module Outline 2017-18 NEW.docxBE855 Module Outline 2017-18 NEW.docx

Module Description
This module is designed to encourage students to reflect on a variety of issues relating to business strategy, such as: the nature of business strategy; the approaches to strategy development; the implications of strategic choices; stakeholder interests and the wider context of strategy. In particular, the module encourages students to evaluate many of the aspects of strategy and strategic thinking that are not usually reflected upon. This module provides students with an insight into the nature of business strategy and its implications which go beyond what might be expected in the standard text book. Consequently, the module offers an insight into a range of current business issues, management dilemmas, ethical considerations, and general governance issues relating to the strategic direction of organizations. Overall, the module provides an introduction to strategy and a critical examination of its application in practice.

Module Aims
The main aim of the module is to enable students to have an understanding of the nature of business strategy and to evaluate its meaning and implications in practice

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
1.Recognise and understand the many varied principles, practices and perspectives involved in business strategy making;
2.Demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding in relation to issues underlying mainstream interpretations of strategic processes;
3.Understand the importance of ideological positions and ethical principles in relation to strategic aspirations and to demonstrate an understanding of the complicated governance issues involved in strategic decision making
4.Critically evaluate the different tools and techniques used in strategy making

Skills for Your Professional Life (Transferable Skills)
As part of this module you will be able to gain the following transferable skills:
1.Enhance your written communication skills through a written assignment
2.Improve your oral communication through a formal presentation as part of group work and further informal in-class discussions
3.Develop your research and critical thinking skills by researching a current business case and applying strategy models to make recommendations to a company. This will also greatly develop your commercial awareness
4.Enhance your teamwork and collaboration experience through extensive group work

The outcome of the MBA Project is a written report of no more than 16,500 words in length, based upon a comprehensive understanding of the relevant literature and elements of primary as well as secondary data research that you have conducted yourself. You are to include an annex of no more than 2,500 words reflecting on how the Director's workshops and your research for the MBA Project will affect your future approach to business and management.

The MBA Project is led by a suitable management issue, problem or business opportunity which is critically discussed or evaluated with reference to existing research and primary as well as secondary data. An understanding of the academic debate and critical application of existing research (and the student's own research) to a case, are key to the MBA Project. To help students select and address a suitable topic, a series of Director's Workshops are run during the Autumn and Spring Terms, addressing current business issues, academic writing and global developments.
Module Aims

The aim of the MBA Project is to demonstrate an understanding of the philosophy and principles of research and show competence in the design, execution and reporting of a business oriented research project or creation of a business plan. The student's ability to carry out subsequent research independently and to commission, manage and evaluate the research activities of others is thereby developed. The students capacity for self-reflection is developed through the Annex to the Report.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
• Show an appreciation of current business and global issues.
• Articulate a business issue and development and execution a plan to address it.
• Make a reasoned and critical selection of information sources, analytical tools and techniques appropriate to the specific issue being investigated.
• Identify and understand ethical issues in management research.
• Synthesis and apply of knowledge from multiple course modules to a business problem.
• Analyse, evaluate, and present a coherent extended argument
• Evaluate and recommend appropriate courses of action.
• Carry out critical reflection

Module Description
This module is designed to encourage students to think and reflect upon the nature of managing people and organisations. In particular, the module encourages students to consider many of the key human aspects of management that are, so often, taken for granted and in so doing provides students with an understanding of core issues that shape the management of organisational performance. Building upon an awareness of these key debates, the module invites participants to analyse workforce issues that shape their management practice.

Module Aims
The main aims of the module are:
1.To enable students to appreciate and analyse the role of people in shaping organisational performance;
2.To enhance in-depth understanding and awareness of own behaviour and small group dynamics in a variety of work settings;
3.To enhance in-depth understanding of the process of change and the management of change in organisations.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
1.Analyse the assumptions that shape our appreciation of workers and the human issues of work;
2.Discuss the role of people and managerial work from a variety of perspectives;
3.Reconsider their managerial practice in the light of critical research on behaviour in organisations;
4.Acknowledge and reflect critically upon those aspects of organisational life that are central to management practices with particular regard to contemporary business practice;
5.Reflect critically on management practices and people in different types of organisations.

Skills for Your Professional Life (Transferable Skills)
By the end of the module, students should be able to:
*Think critically by discussing case studies and articles
*Develop reflective and analytical skills via group exercises
*Work effectively and efficiently in small teams
*Solve problems creatively and collaboratively
*Reflect on their own managerial practice in relation to people behaviours

Module Description
The module provides an introduction to consultancy approaches, from a depth psychology perspective. Participants will study approaches to observing organisational process, the role and stance of the consultant, models of organisational change, interpersonal dynamics in teams, approaches to relational data collection, a variety of consultancy models informed by gestalt, complexity and psychodynamic perspectives and the process of negotiating, contracting and concluding consultancy assignments

Module Aims
* To equip participants with a critical understanding of the nature and design of consultancy engagements
* To develop participants understanding of a range of depth psychology models of organisational change processes,
* To encourage critical dialogue and debate on the consultancy process
* To develop participants' appreciation of the consultancy role and stance
* To develop the employability of participants, through an increased repertoire of tools to engage with organisations;
* To equip students with a range of competencies with which to carry out professional consultancy engagements in the private and public sectors.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
a) Demonstrate a critical understanding of the nature of consultancy engagements
b) Apply this understanding in designing consultancy projects
c) Demonstrate a critical understanding of a range of depth psychology models of organisational change
d) Debate the respective merits of these models, in relation to a variety or organisational contexts
e) Engage in critical dialogue and debate on the consultancy process
f) Demonstrate an understanding of the elements of the consultancy role and stance.
g) Apply the learning from this module , in role, as a consultant.

Skills for Your Professional Life (Transferable Skills)
The module learning outcomes ( above) all contribute to enhancing your professional life

Module Description

This 10 credit optional module is concerned with the key issues associated with the challenges of service transformation in delivering vibrant engaging and cost effective public services. The model is set against the background of a range of new challenges facing leaders across public services organisations during a period of reductions in funding and rising expectations of service users. The challenges for delivering quality public services are significant and established ways of working and existing models of change have proved to be lacking. The case for a new approach has led to the development of an innovative approach to transformation which will be shared with students on this module. This module takes the student through a journey which is designed to empower them to take a critical and practical approach to the challenges of transforming large and small organisations across the public sector. The module will chart the journey from approaches to transformation, the role of customer insight, the imperative to deliver efficient customer journeys, the role of technology, the need for fresh organisational and people deployment models through to developing compelling and evidence based business cases for change which respond to the pressing financial and service challenges facing the public sector. This module will be delivered in the context of political, social, technological and economic change at an international, national and local level and address the four key themes of environmental change, sustainability, innovation and entrepreneurship and economic and social development


Aims

The aims of the module are to enable students to

Critically appraise the transformation process and its application to public services
Develop a robust understanding of a transformation approach aligned to the new environment
Acquire and apply in different public service contexts knowledge about the key components of transformation;
Acquire and apply knowledge about new organisational models and their application;
Apply concepts and techniques to build the case for transformation within organisations
Appreciate critically the value of the combination of people and technology in driving transformation

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the model, students should be able to;

Gain a critical understanding of the principles of transformation and the relevance of the application across public services;

Understand critically the drivers for changes, the context in which public services are delivered and the barriers to transformation;

Carry out in-depth analysis of the main components of transformational change and models which can unlock organisational potential;

Demonstrate an understanding of the power and impact of people and technology in developing customer centric and technology enabled public services

Obtain a critical understanding of the implementation challenges beyond the business case and build and present business cases for transformational change which are evidence based

all with reference to the four main themes of environmental change, sustainability, entrepreneurship and innovation and economic and social development.



Module Description

The purpose of the module is to enable participants to obtain knowledge of supply chains and logistics in practice together with an understanding of key theoretical issues explaining good practice, problems and challenges to effective supply change management in a global context. The course will allow students to investigate large, globally networked organisations through lectures, case studies and group projects. The module will offer insights in supply chain management, the evolution of the management of logistics in the local and in highly networked global environments, and provide students with tools with which to engage supply chain managers.

Aims
The main aims of the module are to:

* offer students in-depth insights into the work of major supply chain and logistics operations from around the world, especially in relation to current practice;
* enable students to derive a practical understanding of the application and use of key technologies, management practice, network arrangements and computational tools supporting real world management of supply chains;
* help students acquire an appreciation of theories and key concepts of supply chain management and their application in practice;
* equip students with know how and key tools with which to engage in supply chain management practice in both local and global environments.

Leadership with its impact on businesses performance and organisational culture is often understood to be a critical factor in creating value and sustainability for modern organisations, regardless of their size or the sector they operate within. This module will enable you to gain knowledge on and insights into leadership, ways of leading and the ways they matter in organisations and beyond them. You will gain an understanding of what leadership is and how thinking about it has developed over time as well as how leadership relates to business performance and how leadership itself is performed. You will also encounter ways of thinking about, and rethinking what leadership is and what it should and could be. We will examine leadership in the context of organisations and nations as well as globally. The module will help you reflect on leadership as a role, a process, a practice and a skill.

Module Description

This 10 credit optional module focuses on three critical new developments relating to the social aspects of business. They include the emergence of social entrepreneurship as a new form of enterprise, the growth of social innovation as a legitimate form of development of new products and services for social purposes with a market orientation, and the social impact of business investment decisions. The module enables students to acquire a critical understanding of theories and practice of how the process of social entrepreneurship, social innovation and social impact embraces a range of entrepreneurial and management skills to address social issues such as exclusion, collaboration, networking, poverty alleviation, inequality and environmental concerns. It is also concerned with the use of those skills to generate new opportunities for their organisations, novel forms of managing people, resources and the wider environment, and for better ways of engaging with different groups of stakeholders


Aims

This module provides the necessary theoretical framework for the study of social entrepreneurship, social innovation and social impact. The module will provide the critical, theoretical underpinning for the study and investigation of the social dimensions of new forms of business organisation, innovation and the impact of investment decisions. by answering five important questions

What are the characteristics of social enterprises?
What and how does social innovation contribute to organisations and the wider economy?
How do investment decisions account for the exploration of opportunities for innovation in both social and economic settings?
How are social enterprises and how is social innovation managed and what skills are necessary for their advancement?
What are the future prospects for sensitive and high social impact investment decision makings and how can they be better supported through effective policy, better awareness of their work and effective management?




Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

Understand critically the concept of a social enterprise, social innovation and the social economy
Obtain a critical appreciation of the vital role social enterprises and social innovation play in addressing societal problems, including, inter-alia, social exclusion to environmental degradation
Understand critically the motivations of social entrepreneurs and investors and the social and institutional barriers to setting up social organisaions
Understand critically the process of social entrepreneurship and social innovation including the generation of social capital and social networking
Recognise the key policy issues that will support the development of social impact investment (Learning Outcomes: A; A3; B1; B 5;C2;C;3 D1-2)


Module Description
The managerial economics module covers two important aspects of organisations: the economics of corporate architectures as well as their governance and control. We apply economic-contracting and transactions-cost approaches to the study of these two aspects of organising.
Though the range of questions that can be covered is broad, we focus on three topical ones: Can we design the contracts of employees, managers, shareholders and bondholders to reduce the disparate tensions that are forever threatening to pull an organization apart without straight-jacketing them? Are expansion phases merely manifestations of empire-building by top managers or offer real gains in innovation and in human capital? Can we identify excessive risk taking while ensuring suitable risks are not avoided? These merely serve to illustrate but three of a myriad of tradeoffs that managers of successful organizations need to make: concepts and tools from economics can provide one guide, and we study these guides.
Organisations operate amongst forces that confine their structures, rules, norms, habits, inertia and momentum. Corporate architecture is an umbrella term for all these forces. The architecture provides guidance, at the same time as imposing restrictions, on how the corporation can be governed. The primary focus, of this course, is on applying the concepts, tools and methods developed within economics towards the coordination and administration of an organisation's activities.
The three-part approach to the economic analysis of architecture is: first, decide who should decide, second, decide the rewards for deciding 'well' and third, decide who has decided 'well'. We have enclosed the word 'well' in quotes – determining what it means to decide 'well' requires agreement on the objective of corporations. I will assume the agreed objective is to maximise the value to the shareholders of the corporation. Nevertheless, deciding a suitable objective for an organisation is a role for political economy and then for corporate law, which brings us naturally to the second important aspect we shall cover - systems of corporate governance.
The notion of governance and control in an organisation is best illustrated by an array of events that occur infrequently in the life of organisations but with large consequences when they do. The topics cover the entire cycle from birth to death. Events such as incorporating a firm (birth), an entrepreneur seeking external capital from banks or venture capitalists (growth), conducting an initial public request for resources and listing on public exchanges (premier league), engaging in mergers and acquisitions (expansion), performing restructuring activities (redirection), and experiencing distress or even ending it all, via liquidation (death). We study the latter three in this module and examine them from the perspectives of contracts and transactions costs.

Aims
We seek to describe and explain the transaction cost approach to understanding the coordination and administration of organised activities. The aims are two-fold. Firstly, we aim to describe the perspectives of contracting (explicit, implicit or incomplete), agency costs and asymmetric information, which are core devices developed in economics, that help garner insights into important resource choices that senior managers cannot but confront if they are to suitably govern their organizations. The larger framework for these choices is the corporate governance system in which the choices are embedded and it is the second aim to describe the political economy associated with the risk distributions among stakeholders of corporations in such systems.

The course has four outcomes:

First, you should be able to employ economic concepts to describe the conflicts of interest inherent in corporations and explain how, in resolving such conflicts, the administration that minimises transactions costs gains competitive advantage.

Second, you should be able to describe the control mechanisms that can reduce such conflicts and explain the complementarities among these mechanisms.

Third, you should be able to describe the concepts of agency and signalling, as well as, explain how these two concepts help analyse important events in corporate governance and control, such as executive compensation, mergers and acquisitions, reorganisations and liquidations.

Finally, you should be able to describe the different corporate governance systems prevalent globally and the political economy associated with the different risk distributions among the stakeholders in these broad macroeconomic settings.

Module Description

This 10 credit compulsory module focuses on theoretical concepts and issues of marketing and of international marketing strategy and their application for practice by businesses. The module is structured along three key themes. Marketing concept and market orientation which provides students with an overview, discussion and analysis of the marketing function and marketing approaches with an aim to strengthen the students context familiarity.
International marketing strategy which delineates the purpose of a strategic approach, its key features, types of market entry strategies and their relevance for new ventures and small businesses.
Marketing planning and control processes which enables students to build an appreciation of decision making processes, specific issues in varied firm contexts and the organisational challenges encountered in developing an international marketing
strategy.

Aims

The module aims to help students develop a critical awareness of general marketing principles and practices and of the facets of international marketing strategy and planning, its role and importance as an element of strategic management, and the implications of international marketing strategy and planning for entrepreneurial activity.


Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:

Develop an understanding of international marketing strategy and planning.

Acquire in-depth understanding of the international marketing strategy formulation process, international market selection and international market entry modes.

Learn to differentiate between the international marketing approaches of large and medium sized firms (SMEs).

Learn to use a range of frameworks for strategic analysis leading towards the development of an international marketing strategy).

Apply techniques, models and frameworks to marketing strategy plans for different types of businesses).

Operations Management is the management of the resources and processes that create and supply the services and/or products of an organization or function. As such Operations Management is relevant to all sectors and most functions within an organization. This module will equip students with the skills to manage operations in a sustainable way that helps deliver the triple bottom line or people, planet and profit.

The module introduces a range of models that help students manage a range of operations from high volume batch processing to low volume bespoke businesses. It considers both production and service organizations and address the increasing blurring of the distinction between the two.


Aims

To develop an understanding of how to design, manage, measure and improve the operations of an organization in a sustainable manner

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

Determine the effect that operations can have on the sustainability of an organization

Critically examine the main performance objectives of operations as they apply to all organizations

Design processes appropriate for the product or service being delivered

Critically assess and select appropriate planning and control tools for an organization

Assess and select appropriate process improvement methods for organizations

Module Description
This module introduces key aspects of accounting and finance, and some of its main applications in contemporary management and decision making. The central consideration of this module is that managers need to be aware of, and be able to critically evaluate, the informational outputs of accounting systems and financial management techniques, and how their application underpins managerial, financing and investment decisions, and contemporary issues of relevance to these techniques. This module also provides a foundation for the study of optional modules in accounting and/or finance.

Module Aims
1.to provide students with sufficient background understanding of accounting and finance principles and their role in the business decision-making process;
2.to enable students to understand selected accounting and finance techniques, their application in organisations and contemporary issues related to these techniques;
3.to support and encourage education and learning, and to foster the capacity for individual study; and
4.to facilitate development of critical and analytical thinking for further academic study, employment and personal development.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
1.Explain and apply the accounting principles and concepts underlying the preparation of financial statements, including notions of cash flow vs. accounting profit and concepts of assets, liabilities, and equity.
2.Be conversant with the form and content of company financial statements (e.g. income statement, cash flow statement, statement of financial position).
3.Apply financial analysis techniques to make informed decisions/recommendations/projections and be aware of selected earnings management practices and controversies associated with meeting analysts' earnings forecasts.
4.Gain clear conceptual understanding of managerial and cost accounting, cost elements and classification, cost behaviours and costing methods and short-term decision-making.
5.Evaluate investments employing standard criteria, such as Net Present Value, and explain their shortcomings.
6.Evaluate investments while employing models that match risk and return as well as describe the conditions in which the models can be reliably deployed.
7.Describe the irreversibility and flexibility of capital investments and illustrate the use of real options.
8.Describe the ways of raising finance and discuss the factors to be considered when deciding on a suitable balance between debt and equity capital.

Skills for Your Professional Life (Transferable Skills)
The module, class activities and coursework will help you to develop the following transferable skills:
a) Ability to develop critical and practical problem-solving skills.
b) Ability to develop interpersonal communication skills through debate and team presentations in class.
d) Ability to identify relevant information from case evidence and financial reports
c) Interpretation of accounting and financial information for decision-making

Module Description
This module introduces key aspects of accounting and finance, and some of its main applications in contemporary management and decision making. The central consideration of this module is that managers need to be aware of, and be able to critically evaluate, the informational outputs of accounting systems and financial management techniques, and how their application underpins managerial, financing and investment decisions, and contemporary issues of relevance to these techniques. This module also provides a foundation for the study of optional modules in accounting and/or finance.

Module Aims
1.to provide students with sufficient background understanding of accounting and finance principles and their role in the business decision-making process;
2.to enable students to understand selected accounting and finance techniques, their application in organisations and contemporary issues related to these techniques;
3.to support and encourage education and learning, and to foster the capacity for individual study; and
4.to facilitate development of critical and analytical thinking for further academic study, employment and personal development.

Learning Outcomes
On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:
1.Explain and apply the accounting principles and concepts underlying the preparation of financial statements, including notions of cash flow vs. accounting profit and concepts of assets, liabilities, and equity.
2.Be conversant with the form and content of company financial statements (e.g. income statement, cash flow statement, statement of financial position).
3.Apply financial analysis techniques to make informed decisions/recommendations/projections and be aware of selected earnings management practices and controversies associated with meeting analysts' earnings forecasts.
4.Gain clear conceptual understanding of managerial and cost accounting, cost elements and classification, cost behaviours and costing methods and short-term decision-making.
5.Evaluate investments employing standard criteria, such as Net Present Value, and explain their shortcomings.
6.Evaluate investments while employing models that match risk and return as well as describe the conditions in which the models can be reliably deployed.
7.Describe the irreversibility and flexibility of capital investments and illustrate the use of real options.
8.Describe the ways of raising finance and discuss the factors to be considered when deciding on a suitable balance between debt and equity capital.

Skills for Your Professional Life (Transferable Skills)
The module, class activities and coursework will help you to develop the following transferable skills:
a) Ability to develop critical and practical problem-solving skills.
b) Ability to develop interpersonal communication skills through debate and team presentations in class.
d) Ability to identify relevant information from case evidence and financial reports
c) Interpretation of accounting and financial information for decision-making

This capstone business planning and management module brings together Strategy, Marketing, Accounting, and Entrepreneurship by challenging the students to create and implement in a simulated environment, a plan for their own business. Operating in groups, students prepare a business plan, present the plan and seek funding by a making pitch for funding. Taking on roles such as Finance or Marketing Director the students will implement their business idea, devising marketing plans and operating models and are given a platform on which to put into practice many taught elements of the course.